Lady Conference Speaker: Speaker Bios

This is, of course, intended to help all potential speakers, but it’s important to me to make sure that my speaking advice is explicitly targeted to women and other under-represented speakers.

The point of a speaker biography is to give people a little context for your talk. It doesn’t need to be long or elaborate, but it does need to tell people why they should listen to you.

So! You need to write a speaker bio. And you’ve been trying to do it for 3 hours now, and you’ve come up with “Me make smart ideas and eat cookies, which is for C”. Somehow you don’t feel like that will meet the goals of the conference or meetup you’re hoping to impress. But how do you do better?

A pink-haired white woman stares off into the upper distance. She is wearing dark glasses and bright lipstick and a whimsical expression

Collective action

The easiest way I’ve ever found to write a biography or anything where nice things should get said about me is to get together with several friends and write them for each other. It’s much easier to say nice things about our friends than ourselves, and they’ll remember things as a group that we forget as ourselves. So let me encourage you to make a party of it. A little cookie dough, a heartening viewing of Legally Blonde, and you’ll find it much less stressful.

The formula

  • Who are you?
  • Why is this something you can speak about?
  • What’s something fun that people can remember about you?

Here’s what I’m using for mine right now:

Heidi is a developer advocate with LaunchDarkly. She delights in working at the intersection of usability, risk reduction, and cutting-edge technology. One of her favorite hobbies is talking to developers about things they already knew but had never thought of that way before. She sews all her conference dresses so that she’s sure there is a pocket for the mic.

Yeah, they’re almost all written in the third person. It’s the standard.

So as you can see, I introduce who I am and who I work for. I have a sentence about what I’m interested in and why I’m probably giving this talk. My third sentence is sort of optional, but does make people ask me what I mean. The last sentence is both true and quirky.

Here’s another example:

An orange and white cat with an orange mustache snuggles into a human hand

Beepulon is a small orange katten just under a year old. He is an expert in making strange un-catlike noises, and also loud sniffing noises. When he is not meeping, prrbping, or snorfling, he enjoys breaking all the rules by standing on the table.

If you went to a session with someone who had this bio, I bet you would not be surprised to hear weird noises and get orange fur on you.

Here are some ideas for what you can put in your sentences.

First sentence

  • Your name (and pronouns, if you wish)
  • Your employer if they are paying for you to be there (if not, consider if they deserve free advertising)
  • Your job title or community standing

Second sentence

  • Your expertise or interests
  • Something that relates to your talk subject
  • Why you’re gonna be great at this

Third sentence

  • Something personal, but nothing embarrassing or that you don’t want to hear about from others
  • Something cute or funny
  • A twist or unique take on your topic

Conclusion

A speaker bio doesn’t exist to tell us everything about you and your experience, just to give us a hint about you and your presentation. It’s stressful to say nice things about yourself sometimes, but if you fill in the blanks, it’s probably going to be a little easier. Write with friends!

Break Orbit, Not Systems – LaunchDarkly’s First Conference

We’re so excited that we have announced our first conference and are actively collecting talk submissions and selling tickets for it!

We thought you might be interested in hearing why we’ve decided it was the right time for a conference about feature management, feature flagging, testing in production, and trunk-based development.

We want to learn from you!

As the developer advocate, I spend a bunch of my time in the field, going to conference talks and listening to what’s happening in the world. And I know that there are people who are stone-cold experts in flagging systems out there. We want to give you a reason to get together and talk to us, and each other, about what you’ve found out about scale, technical debt, and best practices. We saw that Gremlin’s ChaosConf and Honeycomb’s o11ycon gave practitioners a chance to exchange information and cross-polinate ideas, and we’d like to carry that on. I firmly believe that getting people with a common interest together leads to leaps for the entire category they talk about. Look at DevOpsDays!

People are hungry for best practices

Sure, I can tell you about what kinds of flag naming schemes work best, but wouldn’t you rather hear it from someone who is doing it at massive scale, and has been for years? Getting people together, from beginners, to people who built their own systems, to our customers who are using us at scale, gives us all a chance to learn and codify best practices. At LaunchDarkly, we feel like this year is an inflection point for feature management adoption, and as a part of that industry, we want to help the best practices apply as broadly as possible. We hope that Trajectory will let us talk about how testing, design, development, release, and sales can all be accelerated and made more powerful. How are you reaching escape velocity? We’d like to hear.

We think you’re awesome and have great ideas!

We have plans for what direction we’re going to take LaunchDarkly, and what’s next on our wishlist, but we want to make sure it’s going to serve you, our customers and potential customers. It’s no fun building a great technological achievement that doesn’t actually help people.

When people ask me how Edith and John got the idea for Feature Flags as a Service, I always tell them what Edith told me, that she was on so many late-night, weekend deploy bridges that she grew to hate them, and eventually, to build a product that means people can launch and test their software without late-night drama or stress.

We always want to be doing that, making your life easier – so tell us how! We made a wishlist of talks that we hoped would get proposed, but I bet you have ideas on things that you learned that you can talk about or write about. Here are some of the things we thought of:

  • Transformation or disaster stories – learning that we need new software to safely operate in this new world
  • How we deconstructed a monolith
  • How to knock down the cultural barriers and get DevOps/feature flag adoption at massive scale
  • GDPR – 1 year after
  • The new tech stack for brownfield development
  • How to test in production
  • The path to continuous delivery

Other awesomeness

  • The venue is at the Oakland Museum of California
  • Oakland-based catering is gonna be amazing!
  • You! And people like you! And I’m helping pick the swag!

I hope to see you there! Tickets are limited, so don’t overthink it!